Doggd

January, 2016

  • 24 January

    Photographer captures service dog and bride special moment

    Bride and dog2

    Photo by Maddie Peschong/Mad Photo & Design


    Bride and dogWhen Valerie Parrott got married recently in Sioux Falls, SD, her service dog Bella played an important role, according to ABC News.

    For the past nearly three years Bella has been helping her to cope with anxiety, panic attacks, and migraines. A wedding day can often bring all three conditions.

    Just before the ceremony Parrot said her anxiety started to rise as her heart pounded. She and Bella shared a special moment that was captured by wedding photographer Maddie Peschong.

    "Since she’s with me all the time, we wanted to make it special for her as well,” Parrott, 25, told ABC News. “We made a special vest for her and a tutu and she walked by my side down the aisle and sat up front with us during the ceremony.

    “The photos were just sort of us together while we were acknowledging that it was going to be a busy day and we needed to focus on the good things." 

     

  • 24 January

    Dog Video Of The Day: Triple Chase!

    Who will be the winner of the coveted bone trophy?!

  • 24 January

    These pictures pretty much tell the story if you know that the dog is a Husky…

    Husky alone

                                                                                                                                                                         Ventura Co Fire Station 50 

    --a breed known to be extraordinary athletes and first class escape artists with some astonishing instincts.

    IHusky3n his quest for freedom and adventure, things went terribly wrong for this adorable pup when his head got stuck in a dryer vent.

    Fortunately it took the Ventura Co Fire Station 50 in Camarillo, CA about 5 minutes to release him.

    Through the years some of my favorite blog stories have involved Huskies.

     

    They are remarkable dogs, funny dogs, but almost never ordinary.

     

    There are the beautiful athletes who run in the Yukon Quest and Iditarod. Once in a while one of them, like Whitey-Lance, will get impatient while the team is stopped and scare everyone by running their own much longer race without food or human care. They are always grateful to be rescued.  

     

    There was Akira the Husky who was caught on surveillance tape a few years ago strolling into a grocery store straight to the pet food aisle, picking up a rawhide bone, and walking out without paying for it.

    The tape was played by TV stations all across the world before her owners finally realized it was their dog who had traveled 12 miles to get to the store. 

     

    Moon the Husky got separated from her owner and his two other dogs while they were traveling. It took her 8 days to make her way 77 miles to get home across a high desert and two mountain ranges in Nevada. 

     

    Gonzo the Husky lost his eyesight when he was 3-years-old, but not his love of running. His Husky brother Poncho seemed to understand and helped him run in tandem. 

     

    Zander the Husky got so depressed when his owner went into the hospital that he made his way two miles across a stream and through streets where he had never been to reach his beloved human.

     

    Albert the Husky stray was lonely wandering around all by himself, so he dug his way into an animal shelter to introduce himself and make new friends.

     

    Lucy the Husky, nicknamed The Destroyer, beat out hundreds of contenders by chewing her way to freedom to win a national Bad to the Bone contest.

     

    Cato the Husky from South Carolina was caught red pawed shoplifting pigs’ ears, beef bones and dog food from a neighborhood Dollar General store and burying them nearby.

     

    Juneau the Husky saved his owner’s life after he was left paralyzed in a skiing accident.

     

    Toby the Husky had a running account at the local shelter in Alaska and cost his owner over $2000 in fines and citations.

     

    Khyra the full-time Husky and part-time hussy has her own blog.

     

  • 24 January

    This is the only toy that Luca hasn’t destroyed

      Luca and stuffieAn Alaskan Malamute can be a destructive force of nature or a gentle breeze.

    As a college student, Karissa Lerch from Durham, NC couldn’t afford a dog. So she went to Toys-R-Us and got a toy dog instead.

    When she finally was able to get a dog, she chose an Alaskan Malamute, named her Luca and gave her the toy dog. They quickly became inseparable. Karissa says:

    It’s her baby :) She carries it around everywhere and always has. Source

    Luca young Luca chewing

     

     

    Through the years Luca has destroyed many toys, but the
    Toys-R-Us dog she has always kept by her side. 

     

    My blogging buddy Marianne from Northview Diary and I agree that we love these high energy Nordic dogs as long as they belong to someone else. She writes:


    I remember when a lovely full-grown, as in really, really, really, big Malamute was surrendered at the animal hospital where I worked. A guy adopted him within a day or two..he was truly a beautiful dog.

    The guy had a nice truck.....had being the operative word. His folks wouldn't let him keep the dog inside so he left him in that nice truck overnight. Every thing that could be chewed or pooped on was. No seats. No steering wheel. No seat belts. No carpets, no nice truck any more. He even left tooth marks on the window glass. I was awful glad I had Brandy then and didn't adopt him myself. 

  • 24 January

    Olivia Munn & Adopted Puppy In Sultry, Narcissistic Photos

    olivia munn dog chance

    Olivia Munn Adopts Puppy – Actress Olivia Munn and her boyfriend, Aaron Rogers, recently adopted a puppy, named Chance, together. (Named “Chance” for the second chance he got after being in a Puppy Mill)

    Looks like a Springer Spaniel to me. Hmmm… must candid photos from the dog park, right?

    olivia munn dog chance

    I wonder why she’s looking over her shoulder in this photo? It’s like she’s saying, “who let this random puppy into my Maxim photo shoot? Hey, is there a handle on this thing?”

    Anyway, I’m sure Olivia is a great (and obviously beautiful) woman, so who am I to criticize? Plus, it’s always nice to see that the couple chose to adopt instead of opting for a trendy purebred.

    Olivia recently appeared on the Today Show with her puppy, Chance, who showed off some tricks, as you can see below:

    The post Olivia Munn & Adopted Puppy In Sultry, Narcissistic Photos appeared first on Celebrity Dog Watcher - Digging up Celebrity Dog News - Arf!.

  • 24 January

    Why Do Celebrities Love Bulldogs? A Brief History of the Bulldog

    celebrity english bulldog Why Do Celebrities Love Bulldogs?

    English Bulldogs are small, muscular dogs with a big history. They are now the sixth most popular breed of dog in America. In Los Angeles, the home of the celebrities, they are the most popular breed. Celebrities like Pete Wentz, Shia Labeouf, Adam Sandler, David Beckham, and Brad Pitt all own Bulldogs of their own. They are fun to look at and fun to play with.

    A Controversial History: Bulldogs

    The history of the English Bulldog is controversial to say the least. There is some degree of confusion regarding the origins of the bulldogs. In some circles, it is believed that the Bulldog is the parent breed of the larger Mastiff. It’s more commonly accepted that the bulldog originated from crossbreeding the Mastiff and a Pug.

    Some evidence to suggest the second theory comes from the “Book of Dogs”, which was written in 1576 by Johannes Caius. Nowhere in this book is there mention of the Bulldog breed. This leads many to believe that the Bulldog had not yet been crossbred at this time.

    english bulldog history

    Much older texts from the time of the Romans describe short, broad-mouth fighting dogs. These dogs were very popular in sporting events held in the amphitheater. It is believed that these roman fighting dogs were the ancestors of both the Bulldog and the Mastiff.

    The origin of the name “Bulldog” shows what a fierce and formidable breed they once were. Bulldogs were used to guard and bait bulls before the bulls were slaughtered for meat. There was a time when selling beef that had not been baited prior to slaughter was considered a crime. Baiting of bulls was also a popular sport during this time and Bulldogs were the number one contender. They were low to the ground, fearless, and strong enough to bait the biggest of bulls.

    It wasn’t until 1631 that the Mastiff and Bulldog were described as two separate breeds entirely. This first recorded distinction comes in the form of a letter written by Prestwich Eaton. He writes to ask for a case of liquor and some good bulldogs.

    The Bulldog Today

    Bulldogs are no longer used to bait bulls, but their stout, muscular form is a reminder of their past. In truth, the modern Bulldog looks quite different from those bred hundreds of years ago. Bulldogs today are lovable, family-friendly, and extremely intelligent.

    They are appearing more and more in politics, pop-culture, and as sports mascots. Warren G. Harding was the only president to have owned a bulldog. They are one of the one of the most popular mascots for college universities, with the University of Georgia’s “Uga” being the most well-known.

    The odd shape and structure of the Bulldog puts them at an increased risk of developing certain health conditions. Owners must put forth the extra effort to regularly check the health of their dog by visiting the vet. They can develop joint conditions as well as certain respiratory problems. It’s also easy for them to grow overweight if they don’t receive proper exercise. Overweight Bulldogs have an even greater risk of developing health conditions.

    Bulldogs: A Unique Attitude

    Despite their history of being sporting champions, Bulldogs can be quite lazy. Perhaps that’s why they are so popular with celebrities. They also tend to be pretty stubborn. If they aren’t in the mood to walk, then it can be a challenge to get them out of the door. This can be problematic if you’re trying to control their weight.

    Bulldogs are most certainly indoor dogs. They are sensitive to cold weather, but can’t stand that much heat either. If you want a friend to keep you company in the house, then there is no better breed.

    Jonathan Leger is a freelance writer and small business owner. He runs a popular question and answer website at AnswerThis.co.

    The post Why Do Celebrities Love Bulldogs? A Brief History of the Bulldog appeared first on Celebrity Dog Watcher - Digging up Celebrity Dog News - Arf!.

  • 24 January

    What’s Really In Your Dog’s Food?

    prewashatlanta2011 026 (3)We’ve been buying our pups Purina’s Pro Plan food for a while.  It is supposed to be their upper line and is not inexpensive, especially when you are feeding three large dogs.  I thought I was buying a good product until a friend sent me over this information from Dogs Naturally.   It has to do with aflatoxins and melamine or cyanuric acid being found in the food. Toxins which can make your dog very sick and in some cases be deadly.  Like back in 2007 when there was an outbreak of contaminated dog foods and dogs died because of this. 

    A recent test on dry pet food has revealed some dangerous facts about the food your dog or cat may be eating.

    The Consumer Council of Hong Kong recently published the results of testing performed on nearly 40 popular pet foods. The results were a shock to many pet owners. Three popular US food manufacturers, Purina, Hill’s and AvoDerm, all had foods that were found to contain aflatoxin B1.

    What are Aflatoxins?

    Grains such as corn, wheat, and rice, as well as nuts and legumes, are often contaminated with molds, often as a result of poor growing conditions, substandard or extended storage. Molds called aflatoxins can easily grow and produce a very potent carcinogen. Aflatoxins are very stable and even the high temperature processing involved in kibble manufacturing won’t destroy them, leaving little protection for any dog eating that food.

    Purina confirmed this in a statement to the South China Morning Post. They stated that cancer-causing aflatoxins were an “unavoidable natural contaminant.” AvoDerm stated that they have since removed the corn from its formula as they believed it was the source of the aflatoxins.

    Corn has become a major source of aflatoxin. Droughts in the US Midwest in recent years have caused a record amount of mold-infested crops amounting to nearly $75 million in insurance claims. In response to this surplus of  corn that wasn’t safe for human consumption, the FDA increased the allowable amount of aflatoxin permitted in animal feed.

    A History of Aflatoxins And Sick Pets

    The pet food industry is no stranger to product recalls due to these molds.  The earliest documented aflatoxin outbreak dates back to 1974 when hundreds of stray dogs in India died after consuming aflatoxin-contaminated corn. In 1998, 55 dogs died of contaminated corn and in December 2005, over 100 dogs were killed from aflatoxin-contaminated pet food in the US.

    Testing in the US also shows that apart from the recalls from high levels of aflatoxins, nearly every pet food on the market contains aflatoxins or other mold-related mycotoxins. The animal health and nutrition company Alltech analyzed 965 pet food samples and found 98% of them were contaminated with one or more mycotoxins, while 93% contained two or more mycotoxins.

    Even grain-free pet foods still contain a high carbohydrate content, so there is the potential for mold spores to contaminate the kibble during storage, especially if it is exposed to a moist environment. This can also happen in your home if your kibble is stored in a moist basement or an open container.

    How Do Aflatoxins Make Dogs Sick?

    Aflatoxins primarily affect the liver and dogs who eat 0.5 to 1 mg aflatoxin/kg body weight can die within days. Smaller amounts of aflatoxins, like those found in most pet food samples, can cause sub-acute symptoms including weight loss, lethargy, jaundice and even death.

    Aflatoxins are also carcinogenic. They bind with DNA and cause cell mutations. Newberne and Wogan (1968) were able to produce malignant tumors in rats with less than 1 mg of aflatoxin per kg of feed.

    Because eating small amounts of aflatoxins over a period of time will cause cumulative liver damage or cancerous tumors, a very small percentage of affected dogs would be reported,. This means that tens of thousands of cases of liver disease and cancer could be caused by contaminated foods every year but the link would never be reported.

    That’s Not All They Found

    The Consumer Council study also found some other alarming trends. Three of the US brands tested (Purina, Iams and Solid Gold) also contained melamine or cyanuric acid. These are the substances that poisoned thousands of pets in 2007.

    On top of that, processed pet foods also contain other toxic ingredients including heterocyclic amines, acrylamides, and most recently discovered in dry, cooked pet foods, PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) – a chemical used as a flame retardant. Learn more about these toxic ingredients.

    Trevor Smith, a mycotoxin researcher at the University of Guelph, says “A shift in pet food ingredients is on. Instead of worrying about bacteria spoilage or disease contamination, like we have in the past, we now have to focus on removing mycotoxins.”

    Pet owners should avoid any food containing corn, especially as mold infested corns are added to animal feeds. However it’s important to also remember that melamine and other harmful substances will still be in many processed foods, so feeding fresh, whole foods remains the best way to protect your pet from cancer and other diseases that processed pet foods can cause.

    While the article does say that a fresh food diet is the best that obviously isn’t going to work for everyone due to time and expense.  What you can do is carefully look over the ingredients in your dog food and like the article suggests avoid any with corn. There’s also a very helpful site, The Dog Food Adviser, which reviews dog foods. They break down the food by ingredients and let you know what’s good and bad about it as well as giving it a star rating so you can compare to other brands.